accessibility ACCESSIBILITY

Oral Cancer Exam/ Digital xrays

Oral Cancer Exam in Glendora, CA

An oral cancer exam is painless and quick — it takes only a few minutes. Your regular dental checkup is an excellent opportunity to have the exam.

Here’s what to expect:

  1. Preparing for the exam: If you have dentures or partials, you will be asked to remove them.

  2. Your health care provider will inspect your face, neck, lips and mouth to look for any signs of cancer.

  3. With both hands, he or she will feel the area under your jaw and the side of your neck, checking for lumps that may suggest cancer.

  4. He or she will then look at and feel the insides of your lips and cheeks to check for possible signs of cancer, such as red and/or white patches.

  5. Next, your provider will have you stick out your tongue so it can be checked for swelling or abnormal color or texture.

  6. Our Dr. will also ask you to move your tongue from side to side, looking for any visible problems.

  7. In addition, he or she will look at the roof and floor of your mouth, as well as the back of your throat.

  8. Finally, your provider will put one finger on the floor of your mouth and, with the other hand under your chin, gently press down to check for lumps or sensitivity.

Contact us today for your oral cancer exam!


Are digital dental x rays safe?

Even though digital x-rays produce a low level of radiation and are considered very safe, dentists still take necessary precautions to limit the patient's exposure to radiation. These precautions include only taking those x-rays that are necessary, and using lead apron with a thyroid collar to protect our patients.

 

Dental x-rays are one of the lowest radiation dose studies performed. A routine exam which includes 4 bitewings is about 0.005 mSv, which is less than one day of natural background radiation. It is also about the same amount of radiation exposure from a short airplane flight (1-2 hours).


 
The frequency of getting X-rays of your teeth often depends on your medical and dental history and current condition. Some people may need X-rays as often as every six months; others with no recent dental or gum disease and who visit their dentist regularly may get X-rays only every couple of years.